Thursday, September 12th, 2019

Routines to support math talk

Love how my friends at Howard County share all their wonderful math resources.

https://hcpss.instructure.com/courses/106/pages/grade-2-routines

Look fors by my friend John San Giovanni gets at the heart of meaningful math teaching!!!

https://blog.heinemann.com/lookfors-math-5-9

 

 

Wednesday, September 11th, 2019

Math Modeling Networked Improvement Communities (MMNIC)

Lewis, C. (2015). What is improvement science? Do we need it in education? Educational Researcher, 44(1), 54–61.

process of improving practice through systematic inquiry

HOW DO WE ACCELERATE RESEARCH THAT SHOWS EVIDENCE OF POSITIVE OUTCOMES>

Education researchers engage in improving practice, but their findings are seldom shared beyond their school, district, or state (Zeichner, 2001). Thus, promising practices often are not implemented in new contexts or are implemented on a large scale without the necessary capacity to do so and without careful attention to the challenges of implementation (Bryk et al., 2015; Coburn & Stein, 2010)

https://ies.ed.gov/ncee/edlabs/regions/midwest/pdf/REL_2017264.pdf

Thursday, August 29th, 2019

Motivated-COMPUTE Equity

As I begin a new semester with excited new pre-service teachers, I am inspired by Ilana Horn’s book @ilana_horn, Motivated- Designing Math Classrooms Where Students Want to Join In! She identifies five features of a motivational classroom: Students’ sense of belongingness, the meaningfulness of learning, students’ competence, structures for accountability and students’ autonomy. Dr. Horn shared how the mathematics classrooms are socially risky places and how we need to decrease that social risk to increase student participation and math talk. Thank you to stellar teachers like @pegcagle, Rafranz Davis, Sadie Estrella, Chris Luniak, Fawn Ngyuen, Elizabeth Statmore who open up their practices and routines that motivate student participation. I believe all their effort builds each and every student to have math power. M-power “empower” as I like to call it.

This powerful message aligns with 7 best equitable teaching practices that I call COMPUTE to provide equity in the math classroom that I will share with my pre-service teachers and with teachers I work with Lesson Study.

COMPUTE for Equitable Teaching and Learning in the Math Classroom

  • Caring, celebrating and connecting to cultural diversity, cultural contexts and the world we live in to engage in mathematics.
  • Owning the math-  Allow students to share their mathematical thinking and author math ideas that builds on collective knowledge
  • Motivating student to learn by providing experience that taps into learners curiosity and interest where they find challenge and academic success.
  • Problem Posing and Problem Solving as the core math activities to develop metacognition.
  • Understanding with competence and confidence that builds  students’ math identity
  • Targeted feedback to math learning for individual needs and accountable learning
  • Emotionally supportive learning environment where learners feel safe, valued and cared for where mistakes are embraced as steps to learning.

(See blog connecting COMPUTE Equity with Math Modeling Activities that Connect to Students Lived Experiences http://drjennifersuh.onmason.com/2019/08/20/m-power-through-mathematical-modeling-foregrounding-equity-in-modeling-activities/

Wednesday, August 28th, 2019

Why reflect on Past, Present and Future Math Classroom Experiences

Research shows that teachers have rich lived experiences that impacts their beliefs about math teaching and learning. Many have had meaningful eureka moments in math when they first discovered the beauty of the pattern in numbers like seeing how all the sums of odd numbers were square numbers or a phenomenal math happening like using math to figure out exactly how much food to prepare for a Thanksgiving! Well, you always overestimate when it comes to food and inviting company 🙂 The fact is that when push comes to shove, we teach the way we were taught. So if we really want to invite our students into learning environments where they feel like they belong, we will have to be sure we keep equitable teaching practices front and center. Van de walle et al (2019) showcases the 8 teaching practices that we hope all our aspiring teachers see in their present field placements and hope to implement in their future classrooms.

Sunday, August 25th, 2019

A call for teachers as designers and researchers

With the open access and availability of instructional resources on the internet, teachers need think more like teachers as designers and researchers and not just consumers of instructional materials. This is an important teaching skill that allows teachers to be more judicious when selecting tasks and materials for instruction, accessing student learning through action research in their respective classrooms.

Many of these resources are vetted by educators but individual teachers still owe it to themselves and their students to collect evidence of effectiveness based on their teaching context, student population and needs.

That is where EQUAL Mathematics comes in! This website is part of my instructional resources that helps teachers take existing units, lessons and tasks and supplement the material with an equitable teaching lens. How does the material attend to diverse learners who may need a connection to real world application? What are ways to engage each and every learner to activity participate in the sense making process as the lesson progresses so that one can build ownership in their math thinking? What are the multiple representations that are used to communicate math understanding in small groups and to build collective knowledge in the classroom? What routines for sense making and reasoning is encouraged to promote critical thinking ?

Here are some open educational resources (curriculum)
Also check these sites that I have archived for rich tasks

Friday, August 23rd, 2019

Essential Skills for Success for All

http://www3.weforum.org/docs/WEFUSA_NewVisionforEducation_Report2015.pdf 

Tuesday, August 20th, 2019

Foregrounding Equity in Modeling Activities

EQUAL Math- EQUitable Access to Learning Mathematics

How can you build students mathematical power to empower them and motivate them to learn mathematically to serve them? Mathematical modeling is a powerful way to immerse young students in ways that math can serve them in their every day life to make important decisions.

As teachers we must foreground these experience by considering equitable teaching practices that serve all students.There are seven important principles to consider when foregrounding equity in math modeling experiences for young students.

  1. Caring, celebrating and connecting to cultural diversity, cultural contexts and the world we live in to engage in mathematics.
  2. Owning the math-  Allow students to share their mathematical thinking and author math ideas that builds on collective knowledge
  3. Motivating student to learn by providing experience that taps into learners curiosity and interest where they find challenge and academic success.
  4. Problem Posing and Problem Solving as the core math activities to develop metacognition.
  5. Understanding with competence and confidence that builds their math identity
  6. Understanding with competence and confidence that builds their math identity
  7. Targeted feedback to math learning for individual needs
  8. Emotionally supportive learning environment where learners feel safe, valued and cared for where mistakes are embraced as steps to learning.

Here is a toolkit of web resources

Tuesday, April 23rd, 2019

Split it-VAULT-Vertical Articulation to Unpack the Learning Trajectory

Check out Dr. Suh’s latest Publication in the NCTM journal, Teaching Children Mathematics! 

 This article is from her current project called “Math VAULT”, Vertical Articulation to Unpack the Learning Trajectory, which focuses on using Lesson Study and Video Studies to learn from rich mathematics tasks implemented across grade levels that unpack the learning progression and enhance the teaching and learning of mathematics.

Saturday, March 9th, 2019

MSRI 2019-Math Modeling K-16 and beyond

Mathematical Modeling (MM) now has increased visibility in the education system and in the public domain. It appears as a content standard for high school mathematics and a mathematical practice standard across the K-12 curriculum (Common Core Standards; and other states’ standards in mathematics education).  Job opportunities are increasing in business, industry and government for those trained in the mathematical sciences. Quantitative reasoning is foundational for civic engagement and decision-making for addressing complex social, economic, and technological issues. Therefore, we must take action to support and sustain a significant increase in the teaching and learning of mathematical modeling from Kindergarten through Graduate School.

Mathematical modeling is an iterative process by which mathematical concepts and structures are used to analyze or gain qualitative and quantitative understanding of real world situations. Through modeling students can make genuine mathematical choices and decisions that take into consideration relevant contexts and experiences.
Mathematical modeling can be a vehicle to accomplish multiple pedagogical and mathematical goals. Modeling can be used to introduce new material, solidify student understanding of previously learned concepts, connect the world to the classroom, make concrete the usefulness (maybe even the advantages) of being mathematically proficient, and provide a rich context to promote awareness of issues of equity, socio-political injustices, and cultural relevance in mathematics.

A critical issue in math education is that although mathematical modeling is part of the K-12 curriculum, the great majority of teachers have little experience with mathematical modeling as learners of mathematics or in their teacher preparation.  In some cases, mathematics teacher educators have limited experience with mathematical modeling while being largely responsible for preparing future teachers.

Currently, the knowledge in teaching and learning MM is underdeveloped and underexplored.  Very few MM resources seem to reach the K-16 classrooms.  Collective efforts to build a cohesive curriculum in MM and exploration of effective teaching practices based on research are necessary to make mathematical modeling accessible to teacher educators, teachers and students.

At the undergraduate level, mathematical modeling has traditionally been reserved for university courses for students in STEM majors beyond their sophomore year.  Many of these courses introduce models but limit the students’ experience to using models that were developed by others rather than giving students the opportunity to generate their own models as is common in everyday life, in modeling competitions and in industry.

The CIME workshop on MM will bring together mathematicians, teacher educators, K-12 teachers, faculty and people in STEM disciplines.  As partners we can address ways to realize mathematical modeling in the K-12 classrooms, teacher preparation, and lower and upper division coursework at universities.  The content and pedagogy associated with teaching mathematical modeling needs special attention due to the nature of modeling as a process and as a body of content knowledge.

Overarching critical issue of the 2019 CIME Workshop:   How can we individually and collectively advance the teaching and learning of mathematical modeling in K-16?

The following questions will frame the structure of the CIME 2019 Workshop:

1.  CRITICALLY EXAMINE CURRENT MM EDUCATIONAL POLICIES AND PRACTICES:
What is the current state of mathematical modeling (MM) education and why isn’t it a central part of mathematics education from K-16?

  • What policies bring MM into the curriculum and which have presented obstacles?  What has been the impact of Common Core Mathematical Practice Standard 4: Model with mathematics?  What is the role of MM with respect to quantitative literacy?
  • What curricular resources exist?  How do teachers access them?  How are they understood by teachers?  How are they enacted in classrooms?  What is needed?
  • Which professional development approaches are effective for teachers?
  • How does MM appear in current assessments?  How have current assessment development processes and test items supported or created barriers for MM education?
  • What current MM teaching practices support equitable classroom environments in which student thinking is valued and respectfully considered?
  • How does the way we teach mathematics connect with the workplace?

2.  DEVELOP A VISION FOR MATHEMATICAL MODELING EDUCATION:
How can we coordinate and increase efforts to infuse K-16 classrooms with equitable teaching practices through mathematical modeling (MM) education?

  • Student Learning in Equitable and Collaborative Environments
    How can research inform learning trajectories for math modeling elementary, secondary and undergraduate education? What are key competencies to develop for students to be successful modelers?  What are the relationships between mathematical modeling and statistical modeling? How do teachers assess their students’ modeling proficiency?
    What are the affordances and challenges of MM with respect to providing a more equitable, just, and humanizing mathematics education? How can MM be taught through effective, equitable and collaborative group work?
  • Experiential Learning and Community Engagement
    How can modeling tasks be tied to community/cultural contexts?  How can students use their lived experiences and cultural knowledge along with their mathematical tools and reasoning, to engage in MM?  How might MM engage students, especially those who may be marginalized from mathematics?
  • Policy
    How do we convince policymakers and stakeholders of the need for MM in K-16?  What are the benefits and challenges of including MM in standards, textbooks and assessments?  How might MM be included in state/national teacher certification as a competency/domain?  What kind of policy changes would need to happen in order to make MM central in K-16?
  • Professional Preparation and Development: Teachers, teacher educators, mathematicians
    What MM experiences/competencies/support do teachers and teacher educators need to in MM teaching practices and pedagogy?  As they teach MM, how can teachers get ongoing support to meet the challenges associated with acquiring mathematical and computational content knowledge as well as contextual information?
  • Career Preparation and Readiness
    How do we position MM as a critical element of workforce preparation in similar ways to computing and engineering?  How might we use public awareness of data science (including the positive and negative associations) to help people see the value of MM education?  How do we educate policy makers, admissions officers, recruiters, and career counselors about the value of MM in businesses, industry and government agencies?

3.  TAKE ACTION BEYOND CIME:
What will you do after the CIME Workshop to contribute to MM in K-16?

  • What can mathematicians, mathematics teacher educators, teachers, and professionals in industry do to bring more mathematical modeling into the K-16 classrooms?
  • What is the role of each of the constituencies in realizing the vision for mathematical modeling in education?
  • How can the mathematics and mathematics education research communities come together to offer solutions?
  • What innovative ideas are there to provide professional development to teachers at a global scale?
  • How can we use the new Math Modeling Hub platform to create professional communities and resources and sustain these efforts so that they continue to be accessible and useful?

Saturday, March 2nd, 2019

Grant for Teachers and Leaders

These are some smaller grants that I have seen success with teachers/leaders:

https://www.nctm.org/Grants/

Grants of up to $3,000 are awarded to persons currently teaching mathematics in grades Pre-K-12 for the innovative use of technology and other tools to “help teachers and students visualize and concretize mathematics abstractions…”

Grades: PreK-5, 6-8, 9-12
Deadline: May 03, 2019
Classroom teachers receive up to $4,000 for support of in-service programs.
Grades: 9-12
Deadline: May 03, 2019
Classroom teachers receive up to $4,000 for support of in-service programs.
Grades: 6-8
Deadline: May 03, 2019
A program grant of up to $24,000 will be awarded to a classroom grades Pre-K–6 teacher seeking to improve his/her understanding and appreciation of mathematics by completing course work in school mathematics content and pedagogy working toward an advanced degree…
Grades: PreK-5, 6-8
Deadline: May 03, 2019

A grant with a maximum of $3,000 will be awarded for action research conducted as a collaborative by university faculty, preservice teacher(s), and classroom teacher(s) …

Grades: PreK-5, 6-8
Deadline: May 03, 2019
Updated! A scholarship with a maximum of $3,000 will be awarded to an individual currently teaching mathematics at the grades 6–12 level to complete credited course work in the history of mathematics…
Grades: 6-8, 9-12
Deadline: May 03, 2019

Classroom teachers receive up to $4,000 for support of in-service programs.

Grades: PreK-5

https://www.neafoundation.org/for-educators/

https://mccartheydressman.org/teacher-development-grants/

https://teach.com/what/teachers-change-lives/grants-for-teachers/

Other Grant & Fellowship Opportunities

 

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