Publications

 

REPRESENTATIVE SAMPLE OF SCHOLARLY WORK

Suh, J.M. & Seshaiyer, P. (2017). Modeling Mathematical Ideas across the Learning Progressions. Rowman & Littlefield Publishing.

Peer-Reviewed Publications

Suh, J. M. & Seshaiyer, P. (In Press). Co-designing and implementing PBL through Mathematical Modeling in STEM contexts. In Mahnaz, M. & N. Dabbagh (Eds). Handbook of Problem Based Learning. Wiley Publishing.

Suh, J.M., Weiss, A., King, L. & Fulginiti, K. (In press).  Implementing instructional rounds and Lesson Study to support the development of teacher candidates’ Mathematics Knowledge for Teaching. In R. Flessner & D. Lecklider (Eds.). Case Studies of Clinical Preparation in Teacher Education.

Suh, J.M. & Dockery, K. (In press). Inspiring teachers across the professional continuum through collaborative coaching and Lesson Study. In Nancy Gallavan & Putney, L.G. (Eds.), ATE Yearbook Building upon Inspiration and Aspirations with Hope, Courage, and Strength in Teacher Education.

Suh, J.M., Matson, K. & Seshaiyer, P. (2017). Engaging Elementary Students in the Creative Process of Mathematizing Their World through Mathematical Modeling. Education Sciences 7 (62) doi:10.3390/educsci7020062

Suh, J. M., Birkhead, S., Baker, C., Frank, T., & Seshaiyer, P. (2017). Leveraging Coach-Facilitated Professional Development to Create Teacher Social Networks for Enhancing Professional Practice. In M. Boston & L. West (Eds.), Annual Perspectives in Mathematics Education: Reflective and Collaborative Processes to Improve Mathematics Teaching. Reston, VA: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

Suh, J. M., Sprague, D.R. & Baker, C.K. (2016). Transforming mathematics teacher knowledge in the digital age through iterative design of course-based projects. In Niess, M., Driskell, S., & Hollenbrands, K. (Eds.), Handbook of Research on Transforming Mathematics Teacher Education in the Digital Age, 190-214.

Suh, J.M. (2016). Ambitious teaching: Designing practice-based assignments for integrating virtual manipulatives into mathematics lessons. In P. Moyer-Packenham (Ed.), Mathematics Education Digital Era: International Perspectives on Teaching and Learning Mathematics with Virtual Manipulatives,  301-321.

Brown, B. L, Suh, J.M., Parsons, S. A., Parker, A. K., & Ramirez, E.M. (2015). Documenting teacher candidates’ professional growth through performance assessment. Journal of Research in Education, 25 (1), 35-47.

Suh, J.M., King, L.A., & Weiss, A. (2014). Co-Development of professional practice at a professional development school through Instructional Rounds and Lesson Study. In D. Polly, Heafner, T., Chapman, M. & Spooner, M., (Ed.), Professional Development Schools and Transformative Partnerships. 177-189.

Samaras, A. P., Karczmarczyk, D, Smith, L, Woodville, L, Harmon, L, Nasser, I., Parsons, S., Smith, T., Borne, K., Constantine, L., Roman Mendoza, E., Suh, J.M., & Swanson, R. (2014). The shark in the vitrine: Experiencing our practice from the inside out with transdisciplinary lenses. Journal of Transformative Education, 12(4), 368-388.

Suh, J. M. & Seshaiyer, P. (2014). Developing strategic competence by teaching using the Common Core Mathematical Practices, Annual Perspectives in Mathematics Education, 77-87.

Samaras, A. P. with Karczmarczyk, D, Smith, L, Woodville, L, Harmon, L, Nasser, I., Parsons, S., Smith, T., Borne, K., Constantine, L., Roman Mendoza, E., Suh, J.M., & Swanson, R., (2014). A pedagogy changer: Transdisciplinary faculty self-study. Perspectives in Education, 32 (2), 117-135.

Suh, J. M. & Seshaiyer, P. (2014). Examining teachers’ understanding of the mathematical learning progression through vertical articulation during Lesson Study. Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, 1-23.

Suh, J. M. & Seshaiyer, P. (2013). Informing Research: 21st century. Mathematics in the Middle Grades.NCTM.Reston, VA.

Suh, J.M., Seshaiyer, P., Moore, K., Green, M., Jewell, H., & Rice, I. (2013). Being an Environmentally Friendly Engineer. Teaching Children Mathematics, 20(4), 261-263.

Moyer-Packenham, P.S., Salkind, G., Bolyard, J.J., & Suh, J.M. (2013) Effective Choices and Practices: Knowledgeable and Experienced Teachers’ Uses of Manipulatives to Teach Mathematics, Online Journal of Educational Research, 2(2), 18-33.

Smith, T. M., Seshaiyer, P., Peixoto, N., Suh, J. M., Bagshaw, G., & Collins, L. K. (2013). Exploring Slope with STAIRS & STEPS. Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School, 18(6), 370–377.

Suh, J. M., & Fulginiti, K. (2012). “Situating the Learning” of Teaching: Implementing Lesson Study at a Professional Development School. School-University Partnerships, 5(2), 24–37.

Suh, J. M. & Seshaiyer, P. (2012). Modeling ten-ness using technology. Teaching Children Mathematics, 18(9), 574-579.

Moyer-Packenham, P.S. & Suh, J.M. (2012). Learning Mathematics with Technology: The Influence of Virtual Manipulatives on Different Achievement Groups.Journal of Computers in Mathematics and Science Teaching, 31(1).

Seshaiyer, P., Suh, J.M. & Freeman, P.W. (2011). Unlocking the locker problem through technology.Teaching Children Mathematics, 18(5), 322-325.

Suh, J. M. & Fulginiti, K.L. (2011). Using technology to understand rate of change. Teaching Children Mathematics, 18(1), 56-58.

Suh, J.M., Graham, S., Ferranone, T., Kopeinig, G. & Bertholet, B. (2011). Developing persistent and flexible problem solvers with a growth mindset. In D. J. Brahier, (Ed.), Motivation and Disposition: Pathways to Learning Mathematics, NCTM 2011 Yearbook, 169-184.

 This chapter describes design research conducted by a group of mathematics teachers and a university researcher who collaborated through Lesson Study, a form of professional development that focuses on research lessons. At the beginning of our Lesson Study, we developed our research aim and overarching goal: to develop persistent and flexible problem solvers. Through collaborative planning and designing of problem-driven lessons throughout the academic year, the teacher– researchers developed classroom communities of inquiry and specific strategies that promoted students’ persistence and flexible thinking in problem solving. Teachers observed marked progression in students’ productive dispositions to- ward mathematics throughout the school year. Students developed a “growth mindset” (Dweck 2006) focused on effort and persistence in learning mathematics. The Lesson Study model of professional development also influenced teachers’ instructional practices in developing persistent and flexible problem solvers.

Suh, J. M., Seshaiyer, P., Freeman, P.W. & Jamieson, T.S. (2011). Developing teachers’ representational fluency and algebraic connections. In Wiest, L. R., & Lamberg, T. (Eds.).     Proceedings of the 33rd Annual Meeting of the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education. 738-746.

 This study examined the development of thirty-seven elementary and middle grades teachers’ algebraic connections and representational fluency during a six-month professional learning project. To evaluate the collaborative nature of designing professional development, the team of professional developers/researchers used the collective self-study method (Samaras & Freese, 2006) to examine how purposively designed experiences such as the content-focused institute in the summer with school-based follow-up Lesson Study cycles (Lewis, 2002) in the fall encouraged vertical articulation of algebraic connections. The analysis of teachers’ reflections from problem solving tasks and Lesson Study and researchers’ memos from observed research lessons revealed more flexibility in teachers’ representational fluency with problem solving strategies in the classrooms.

Suh, J.M. & Fulginiti, K.L. (2010). Developing mathematical potential in underrepresented populations through problem solving, math discourse and algebraic reasoning. Sense Publication, 67-79.

The following study explored strategies for developing mathematical potential and enhancing mathematics instruction for diverse learners from low socio-economics populations identified as “young scholars”. The intentional focus on designing and creating opportunities to foster mathematics potential and build collective knowledge influenced many of the pedagogical decisions made by the teacher and research in their jointly planned research lessons.  The most salient features in developing mathematics potential in these young scholars were giving opportunities to 1) engage in rich mathematical tasks and sequence related problems, b) use multiple representations to develop representational fluency and c) develop mathematical communication where reasoning and proof and sense making became a habit of mind and the focus of classroom discussion.

Suh, J. M. & Parker, J. (2010). Developing reflective practitioners through Lesson Study with pre-service and in-service teachers. AMTE monograph. VII. Mathematics Teaching: Putting Research into Practice at All Levels. Associations of Mathematics Teacher Educators, 125-140.

This case study describes pre-service teachers collaboratively planning and reflecting with cooperating teachers and other educators at their clinical site. Using lesson study as the professional development structure, preservice teachers worked with classroom teachers, resource specialists and mathematics educators while being immersed in authentic teaching situations that revealed complex pedagogical issues and factors impacting the teaching and learning of mathematics. Qualitative analysis of teacher interviews, reflections, classroom observations, and planning documents revealed several unique outcomes including developing mathematical knowledge for teaching through a reciprocal learning process; revealing specific gaps in mathematical knowledge for teaching among preservice teachers and increasing preservice teachers’ awareness of the complexity of teaching and reflective practice. Finally, the study identifies specific critical norms for ensuring the success of lesson study among preservice and practicing teachers.

Suh, J.M. (2010a). Leveraging cognitive technology tools to expand opportunities for critical thinking on data analysis and probability in elementary classrooms.Journal of Computers in Mathematics and Science Teaching 29(3), 289-302.

 The following case studies describe technology-enhanced mathematics lessons in two diverse fifth and sixth grade classrooms at a Title I elementary school near the metropolitan area. The project’s primary goal was to design tasks to both leverage technology and enhance access to critical thinking in mathematics, particularly with data analysis and probability concepts. This paper highlights the opportunities that technology-rich mathematics environments. In addition, the case studies illustrate how to design and implement mathematical tasks using technology to provide opportunities for higher mathematical thinking processes as defined by the Process Standards of the national Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM, 2000): problem solving, connections, representations, communication, reasoning and proof.

Suh, J.M. (2010b). Tech-knowledgy for diverse learners [Technology Focus Issue]. Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School in Mathematics Education, 15(8), 440-447.

   To leverage cognitive tech tools for mathematics teaching and learning, teachers must consider the needs of diverse learners and be equipped to support their learning difficulties by taking advantage of this technology. Most important, teachers must have “tech-knowledgy”: the knowledge necessary to use cognitive tech tools effectively to construct mathematical knowledge, evaluate the mathematical opportunities presented, and design learning tasks with these tools that amplify the mathematics.

Suh, J.M., Graham, S., Ferranone, T., Kopeinig, G. & Bertholet, B. (2011). Developing persistent and flexible problem solvers with a growth mindset. In D. J Brahier, (Ed.), Motivation and Disposition: Pathways to Learning Mathematics, NCTM 2011 Yearbook, 169-184.

Suh, J. M. & Fulginiti, K.L. (2011). Using technology to understand rate of change. Teaching Children Mathematics, 18(1), 56-58.

Suh, J. M. & Parker, J. (2010). Developing reflective practitioners through Lesson Study with pre-service and in-service teachers. AMTE monograph. VII. Mathematics Teaching: Putting Research into Practice at All Levels. Associations of Mathematics Teacher Educators, 125-140.

This case study describes pre-service teachers collaboratively planning and reflecting with cooperating teachers and other educators at their clinical site. Using lesson study as the professional development structure, preservice teachers worked with classroom teachers, resource specialists and mathematics educators while being immersed in authentic teaching situations that revealed complex pedagogical issues and factors impacting the teaching and learning of mathematics. Qualitative analysis of teacher interviews, reflections, classroom observations, and planning documents revealed several unique outcomes including developing mathematical knowledge for teaching through a reciprocal learning process; revealing specific gaps in mathematical knowledge for teaching among preservice teachers and increasing preservice teachers’ awareness of the complexity of teaching and reflective practice. Finally, the study identifies specific critical norms for ensuring the success of lesson study among preservice and practicing teachers.

Suh, J.M. & Fulginiti, K.L. (2010). Developing mathematical potential in underrepresented populations through problem solving, math discourse and algebraic reasoning. Sense Publication, 67-79.

The following study explored strategies for developing mathematical potential and enhancing mathematics instruction for diverse learners from low socio-economics populations identified as “young scholars”. The intentional focus on designing and creating opportunities to foster mathematics potential and build collective knowledge influenced many of the pedagogical decisions made by the teacher and research in their jointly planned research lessons.  The most salient features in developing mathematics potential in these young scholars were giving opportunities to 1) engage in rich mathematical tasks and sequence related problems, b) use multiple representations to develop representational fluency and c) develop mathematical communication where reasoning and proof and sense making became a habit of mind and the focus of classroom discussion.

Suh, J. M., & Fulginiti, K. (2009). Building collective knowledge using pedagogical content tools and problem solving. Proceedings of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education. (pp. 5-177-184).  ISBN# 972-960-243-652-3

Suh, J.M. (2010a). Leveraging cognitive technology tools to expand opportunities for critical thinking on data analysis and probability in elementary classrooms.Journal of Computers in Mathematics and Science Teaching 29(3), 289-302.

 The following case studies describe technology-enhanced mathematics lessons in two diverse fifth and sixth grade classrooms at a Title I elementary school near the metropolitan area. The project’s primary goal was to design tasks to both leverage technology and enhance access to critical thinking in mathematics, particularly with data analysis and probability concepts. This paper highlights the opportunities that technology-rich mathematics environments. In addition, the case studies illustrate how to design and implement mathematical tasks using technology to provide opportunities for higher mathematical thinking processes as defined by the Process Standards of the national Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM, 2000): problem solving, connections, representations, communication, reasoning and proof.

Suh, J.M. (2010b). Tech-knowledgy for diverse learners [Technology Focus Issue]. Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School in Mathematics Education, 15(8), 440-447.

 To leverage cognitive tech tools for mathematics teaching and learning, teachers must consider the needs of diverse learners and be equipped to support their learning difficulties by taking advantage of this technology. Most important, teachers must have “tech-knowledgy”: the knowledge necessary to use cognitive tech tools effectively to construct mathematical knowledge, evaluate the mathematical opportunities presented, and design learning tasks with these tools that amplify the mathematics.

Suh, J. M. (2010). Using the unique features of virtual manipulatives to design lessons. In P.S. Moyer-Packenham (Ed.), Teaching mathematics with virtual manipulatives , 20-27. Rowley, VA: Didax.

Suh, J.M., Moyer-Packenham, P.S. & Bolyard, J. J.  (2010) Virtual manipulatives in classroom research In P.S. Moyer-Packenham (Ed.), Teaching mathematics with virtual manipulatives , 26-44. Rowley, MA: Didax.

Suh, J. M., & Fulginiti, K. (2009). Building collective knowledge using pedagogical content tools and problem solving. Proceedings of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education. (pp. 5-177-184).  ISBN# 972-960-243-652-3

Suh, J. M., Johnston, C. & Doud, J. (2008). Enhancing mathematics learning in a technology rich environment.Teaching Children Mathematics, 15(4), 235-241.

Hjalmarson, M. & Suh, J. M. (2008). Developing mathematical pedagogical knowledge by evaluating instructional materials. Inquiry into Mathematics Teacher Education. AMTE Monograph V. 97-107.

Suh, J. M. & Jamieson, S. (2008). Collaborative mentoring: Establishing a mathematics teaching & learning community through Lesson Study. NCTM’s Empowering Mentors of Mathematics, NCTM.
link to publication

Suh, J. M., Johnston, C., Mills, M., & Jamieson, S. (2008). Promoting decimal number sense and representational fluency. Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School, 14(1), 44-50.

Suh, J. M. & Moyer, P. S. (2008). Scaffolding Special Needs Students’ Learning of Fraction Equivalence Using Virtual Manipulatives. Proceedings of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (pp. 4-297-304).  ISSN# 0771-100X

Suh, J. M. (2007). Developing “Algebra -‘rithmetic” in the elementary grades. Teaching Children Mathematics, 14(4), 246- 250.

Suh, J. M. (2007). Tying it all together: Building mathematics proficiency for all students. Teaching Children Mathematics, 14(3), 163-169.

Scaptura, C., Suh, J. M., & McHaffey, G. (2007). Masterpieces to mathematics: Using art to teach fraction, decimal, and percent equivalents. Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School, 13(1), 24-28.

Suh, J. M., & Moyer-Packenham, P. S. (2007). Developing students’ representational fluency using virtual and physical algebra balances. Journal of Computers in Mathematics and Science Teaching. 26 (2), 155-173. This classroom project involved two groups of third-grade students in a week-long unit focusing on algebraic relationships. The purpose of the unit was to engage students with different algebraic models and encourage students to use in- formal strategies to represent their relational thinking. The paper highlights examples of these student representations as evidence of the children’s developing algebraic thinking. Result from the pre and posttest measures showed that students in the physical and virtual manipulative environments gained significantly in achievement and showed flexibility in translating and representing their understanding in multiple representations: manipulative model, pictorial, numeric, and word problems. The researchers recorded field notes, interviewed students, and videotaped class sessions in order to identify unique features of the learning environments. The virtual environment had unique features that promoted student thinking such as: (a) explicit linking of visual and symbolic modes; (b) guided step-by-step support in algorithmic processes; and (c) immediate feedback and self-checking system. In the physical environment, some unique features were: (a) tactile features; (b) opportunities for invented strategies; and (c) mental mathematics. These results show that although the different manipulative models had different features, both the physical and virtual environments were effective in sup- porting students’ learning and encouraging relational thinking and algebraic reasoning.

Suh, J. M. & Moyer, P. S. (2007). The Application of Dual Coding Theory in Multi-Representational Virtual Mathematics Environments. Proceedings of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education. Vol 4, pp. 209-216. Seoul: PME.

Suh, J. M., Moyer, P.S., & Heo, H. J. (2005). Examining technology uses in the classroom: students developing fraction sense by using virtual manipulative concept tutorials, Journal of Interactive Online Learning, 3(4), 1-22.

 
 Awards and honors

Recognition. In March 2011, I received an internal nomination letter from the Associate Provost for Faculty Development and the Director of the Center for Teaching Excellence for the Rising Star Outstanding Faculty Award (OFA) sponsored by the State Council of Higher Education in Virginia (SCHEV). The OFA program recognizes and rewards excellence in teaching, research and scholarship and public service among Virginia Institutions. Although I did not win this award, the nomination was a great honor and recognition of my accomplishments in teaching, research and scholarship and public service.

Presentations

NCTM 2009: Let’s Talk: Building Meaningful Math Discourse

AERA 2009: TIME for Excellence: Developing Collective Efficacy with Teacher Leadership

ACADEMIC INSTITUTE FCPS 2009: Building collective knowledge and making generalizations

CEHD RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM: Transforming teachers’ belief and practices by developing algebraic connections

NCTM 2008: Developing persistent & flexible problem solvers

UTAH 2008: Lesson study using technology tools

AMTE 2008: Developing Math Knowledge for teaching through Collaborative planning

PME 2007: Dual Coding Theory & Virtual Math Environments

ISTE 2007: Tech-knowledgy in Math

AMTE 2007:Modeling Math Meaningfully

Research Reports

PME 2008: Scaffolding Special Needs Students’ Learning of Fraction Equivalence Using Virtual Manipulatives

PME 2007:

PME-NA 2007:

Research Interests

Developing mathematics pedagogical content knowledge and confidence in teachers

Building mathematical proficiency to diverse student populations

Using multiple representations, mathematical models and emerging technology to enhance teaching and learning

Dissertation as PDF

http://crlt.indiana.edu/resources/educationaljournals.html

b. Abstracts for additional publications, presentations, and grants

 https://youtu.be/B4I_FO4rcdU , an example of University-School-Community Engagement from the recent USA Science Engineering Festival, April 15-17 at the DC Convention center, where teachers, students and grad students showcased their math modeling project from our NSF grant, IMMERSION.

 

 

 

GMURGB